Goddess Oracle Deck

Aida-Wedo
Al-Uzza
Amaterasu
Anat
Aphrodite
Ariadne
Arianrhod
Artemis
Athene
Benzaiten
The Black Virgin
Blodeuwedd
Bride
The Cailleach
Ceres
Cerridwen
Ch'ang O
Chalchiuhtlicue
Coyolxauhqui
Danu
Diana
Erzulie
Faerie
Fatima

Freyja
Gaea
Ganga
Green Tara
Gwenhwyfer
Hathor
Hekate

Hel
Hera
Ho Hsien-Ku
Idun
Inanna
Ishtar
Isis
Jeanne D'Arc
Kali
Kamrusepas
Kelaeno
Kirke
Kore
Kwan Yin
Laverna
Lilith
Macha
The Magdalene
Maman Brijit
Medusa
Melaina

Momoy
Morgana
Nekhbet
Nu Kua
Nut
Nyx
Oshun
Oya
Pele
Pomona
Rhiannon
Sedna
Sekhmet
Selene
Sengen
Sheila-na-gig
Sibyl

Sif
Skuld
Sophia
Sri Lakshmi
Sunna
Tlazolteotl
Uma
Vesta
The Virgin Mary
Vivian
White Tara
Yemaya

 

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Mary Magdalene was a disciple of Jesus and witness to His resurrection. Her epithet Magdalene means "of Magdala", a fishing village on the Sea of Galilee. She is mentioned briefly in the four canonical Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), as a woman "out of whom [Jesus] had cast seven demons". Among the varying accounts in the Gospels, Mary Magdalene is the constant as witness to Jesus' resurrection. In the Gospel of John, three Marys are mentioned at the cross--Mary, the mother of Jesus; Mary, Her sister and His aunt; and Mary Magdalene, three being a number long associated with women and the Goddesss.

Through an old confusion with Mary of Bethany (sister to Lazurus, whom Jesus raised from the dead), Mary Magdalene was often depicted washing the feet of Jesus with Her tears and anointing Him with oil of spikenard (an herb related to lavendar). As Mary of Bethany was called a "sinner", Mary of Magdala was traditionally believed to have been a prostitute, though the Bible never explicitly says so. She was portrayed by medieval artists as weeping hysterically and gave Her name to the word maudlin, meaning overly sentimental or sorrowful.

In the non-canonical Gnostic Gospels--early Christian writings (accepted as true then) that were later rejected by Church leaders when the Bible was standardized--there is a somewhat different picture. In the Gospel of Philip, Mary Magdalene is called the "companion" of Jesus, which has often been interpreted to mean "consort". Also in Philip, Jesus is said to "often kiss her on her mouth", and has to answer a question from the other disciples as to why He "love[s] her more than all of us?" Jesus often called Her "the Blessed One", and She was one of three Marys who "walked always with the Lord"--Mary Magdalene, His mother Mary, and His aunt Mary.

Among the Gnostic Gospels is a Gospel of Mary Magdalene, in which She tells the other disciples of a vision She has had of Jesus. And some scholars believe that She may have been the real author of the canonical Gospel of John.

Drawing this card indicates doomed or hopeless love, grief and loss, with a strong spiritual component. Faith (in a religion, in the world, or in yourself) in this situation can bring hope, healing, and comfort.

Alternate names: Maria, Mariam

Titles: the Pleroma or "All-blessed Pleroma" (called so by Jesus in the Pistis Sophia text). The Pleroma ("fullness") is a Gnostic concept of the state of indwelling divinity, an emanation of God.

For Her tale, go here.

 

 


This design available on journals, mugs, t-shirts, greeting cards, framed prints, and more over at The Cat and Cauldron. Ideas or requests? Email me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“I weep and am not emptied.”

 

Goddess Tales

Aida-Wedo
Amaterasu
Aphrodite
Ariadne
Arianrhod
Athene
Blodeuwedd
Bride
Cerridwen
Ch'ang O
Coyolxauhqui
Freyja
Ishtar
Kali
Kirke
Kore
Laverna
Lilith
The Magdalene
Medusa
Pomona
Rhiannon

 

All art here ©2004 Thalia Took, aka The Artist Formerly Known As Mary Crane.
You are free to borrow the images here for your own personal or religious use. If you use any on your
personal non-commercial website, please credit the work to Thalia Took.
If you can link back to this site, I'd appreciate it. Always ask permission first for any other requests for use of this art.
Obscure Goddess Online Directory text ©2006 Thalia Took, and please do not reproduce it.
Questions or comments? E-mail me.